Tag Archive for: Immigration

Job Opportunity: Communications and Administration Assistant

Reports to: Both the Communications Coordinator and the Executive Assistant

Salary: $41,000 annually

Permanent Full-Time

Start date: March 16, 2022

Hours: 37.5 hours per week (9:00 am to 4:30 pm; Monday to Friday) with some need for evening and weekend availability

The Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan is committed to promoting, fostering, improving and developing multiculturalism in the cultural, economic, social and political life of Saskatchewan while working to achieve equality of all residents. MCoS is a non-profit charitable provincial cultural organization that provides service and support to multicultural and ethnocultural organizations across Saskatchewan. The office is located in Regina.

We are currently seeking an experienced Communications and Administration Assistant on permanent basis. It will include comprehensive benefits and pension plan packages, effective following successful 3-month probation.

Responsibilities:

The Communications and Administration Assistant is responsible for interacting with and providing support to staff, volunteers and the public. Approximately 70% of this position’s time will be spent on communications, and 30% on administration.

Under the supervision of the Communications Coordinator, the Communications and Administration Assistant is responsible for:

Communications: The position is responsible for working with the communications Coordinator to support the communications of MCoS to members and stakeholders. Tasks associated with this responsibility include:

  • Website and social media (expertise using WordPress, Hootsuite, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter)
  • Google and social media analytics
  • Media Scanning
  • Graphic designing for social media and larger campaigns
  • Preparing monthly e-newsletter using Mailchimp
  • Preparing and/or inputting communications updates to distribute information of interest to multicultural stakeholders through the newsletter and website.
  • Undertaking internet research as requested (e.g. for speeches and campaign planning).
  • Prepare and deliver educational, publicity and informational materials (brochures, infographic, promo items etc.) to increase awareness about multiculturalism.
  • Ensuring that the organization’s brand guidelines are followed in communications materials developed and shared by this position
  • Developing and managing a system to collect community information that may be of interest to multicultural stakeholders

Under the supervision of the Executive Assistant, the Communications and Administration Assistant will perform the following:

Reception: The position is responsible for ensuring the members, stakeholders and the general public are able to access MCoS services and information reliably and consistently. Tasks associated with this responsibility include:

  • Ensuring that the office is open during office hours (currently the office is closed to the public and we are working remotely due to COVID)
  • Greeting visitors in a welcoming and respectful manner
  • Answering phone calls, taking messages, forwarding calls
  • Handling inquiries from staff, clients and other stakeholders within capacity
  • Relaying information accurately, clearly, concisely and in a courteous manner

Financial Process Support: MCoS bookkeeping and payroll are done externally. Under the direction of the Executive Assistant, this position is responsible for maintenance and preparation of MCoS documents related to finances and communication with bookkeepers and others. Tasks associated with this responsibility include:

  • Preparation of cheque requests
  • Preparation of deposits
  • Monitor and record payments, payables and receivables
  • Assisting with year-end finances

Records Management: The position is responsible for preparation and management of documents and records for MCoS. Tasks associated with this responsibility include:

  • Providing secretarial support to staff, members and volunteers under the direction of the Executive Assistant
  • Creating and filing electronic copies of documents
  • Printing, copying, filing, scanning, and distributing (mailings, meetings, etc.) documents
  • Maintaining and improving office filing system (computer and paper) under the direction of the Executive Assistant
  • Establishing and maintaining a data management system to support reporting and the accountability of MCoS: tracking incoming calls, e-mails, mail, visitors, etc. for statistical reports

Mail: The position is responsible for ensuring all correspondence received by or originating from MCoS is handled appropriately. Tasks associated with this responsibility include:

  • Collecting, opening, recording and routing incoming mail, faxes and materials
  • Assembling, recording, stamping and labeling outgoing mail
  • Sending, forwarding and replying to emails as appropriate
  • Accurately maintaining and updating mailing and contact databases

Office: The position is responsible for the day-to-day oversight of the MCoS office. Tasks associated with this responsibility include:

  • Handling office needs such as delivery, parcel service, etc.
  • Ordering and maintaining supplies as required with consultation with EA
  • Maintaining a clean and tidy entrance and office
  • Maintaining office equipment while following office policies and procedure

Travel and Meeting Arrangements: The position is responsible for travel and meeting logistics for MCoS staff, board members and other volunteers and contractors of MCoS as required. Tasks associated with this responsibility include:

  • Arranging meeting and event facilities, registration, accommodation, etc.
  • Organizing details and travel arrangements for Board, committee and general meetings
  • Preparing and processing expense claims

Other duties as required

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and Requirements:

  • Applicants for this position must have relevant post-secondary education and/or work experience in both communications and administration.
  • This position requires exceptional communication skills and a positive attitude
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite, with a strong emphasis on Excel Microsoft Office Suite is essential. Experience with SharePoint is an asset.
  • Website and digital content management: WordPress, Hootsuite, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Mailchimp, Dropbox;
  • Graphic design with knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite and Adobe Premiere Elements, and desktop publishing with at least an intermediate level of proficiency;
  • Filming and video editing skills with at least an independent level of proficiency;
    Photography skills and editing;
  • Proficiency in the use of the following office technology: computers, voice messaging systems, photocopier, mail station, etc.;
  • Strong organizational skills and a commitment to professionalism, including the ability to multi-task, manage timelines and multiple deadlines;
  • Demonstrate a proven track record of working harmoniously within teams;
  • Independent, energetic, analytical, self-starting and responsible worker, driven by successful, punctual and quality outcomes;
  • Experience in non-profit or community-based organizations is an asset;
  • Strong connections to Indigenous and/or multicultural communities are an asset
  • Have the ability to travel in Saskatchewan from time to time, a valid driver’s license is an asset;
  • Be willing to work occasional evenings and weekends.

This position requires a criminal record check.

APPLICATION PROCESS

We would like to have the Communications and Administration candidate start by March 16, 2022.

Application deadline:  Monday, February 14, 2022 by 5:00 p.m.

The interview will include an experiential assignment to demonstrate your skills.

Applications must include:

  • Cover letter and résumé clearly outlining how you meet the education or experience, knowledge, skills, abilities and requirements for this position.
  • Portfolio demonstrating your work.
  • Three references who can tell us more about you at work (ensure they are ready and available to be contacted by email).

To apply, please email your cover letter, résumé, portfolio, and references with the subject line: Communications and Administration Assistant, cover letter along with three (3) references to:

Rhonda Rosenberg, Executive Director

Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan

hr@mcos.ca

MCoS appreciates all responses from candidates currently legally entitled to work in Canada to this opportunity, however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. We are committed to workplace diversity; candidates are welcome to self-identify as belonging to equity-seeking groups.

Download Job Description

MCoS Communications and Administration Assistant Job Description 2022 (pdf)

Job Opportunity: Communications Coordinator

Responsible to:          Executive Director

Starting Salary:         $55,000 – $60,000 per year

Hours:                         Full-time: 37.5 hours per week (M-F 9:00 am to 4:30 pm; with flexibility)

Start date:                As soon as possible

The Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan (MCoS), a non-profit provincial organization has a career opportunity for a strong communications generalist. The candidate for the position of Communications Coordinator will lead the development of communications plan, execute, strengthen relationships with media, increase profile and understanding of multiculturalism throughout the province, develop a wide array of communication materials, oversight of social media and website, deepen engagement with the multicultural community, and support the communication needs of other project coordinators.

Responsibilities:

The Communications Coordinator is responsible for coordinating the organization’s communication efforts, internally and externally, based on an overarching communications strategy that aligns with the organization’s mandate, strategic and operational plans. The Communications Coordinator plays a central role in establishing, strengthening and promoting MCoS’ public image and key messages in order to achieve the Ends as defined by the Board of Directors. The Communications Coordinator reports and is responsible to the Executive Director, and works in accordance with the policies of the organization.

The Communications Coordinator will work both independently and collaboratively to be responsible for:

  • Developing and implementing annual or multi-year communications strategies, in conjunction with Executive Director;
  • Internal and external communications and campaigns designed to reach target groups with key messages associated with the overarching plans of MCoS;
  • Providing communications and stakeholder relations advice for membership activities;
  • Developing, coordinating and maintaining a series of tools designed to effectively deliver various MCoS communication messages to target groups as required. Tools may include, but are not limited to: newsletters, brochures, publications (electronic/print), website, digital, advertising (print, web, television, radio and other), media advisories, news releases, stories, and surveys;
  • Supervising the Communication Specialist and Administrative Assistant in communications roles related to newsletter, website, social media, and production of tools;
  • Basic graphic design with knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite and Adobe Premiere Elements;
  • Website and digital content management – WordPress, Hootsuite, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn;
  • Tracking and monitoring media coverage related to all MCoS activities;
  • Coordinating and ensuring communication consistency among membership and partnership across all channels;
  • Developing and implementing communication campaigns to promote MCoS’ fundraising activities, including but not limited to, the annual promotion of the Multifaith calendar;
  • Supporting MCoS’ advocacy role through research and development of advocacy tools designed to build awareness of the benefits of multiculturalism in the province;
  • Building and strengthening relationships with all MCoS stakeholder groups (such as businesses, multicultural community groups, educational institutions, and government representatives);
  • Branding: a strong custodian of maintaining the visual identity and branding of MCoS communication materials;
  • Sourcing outside agencies and suppliers, through Request for Proposals and contracts, to support communication requirements and effectively managing the resulting contracts;
  • Preparing and submitting campaign, project reports, and annual budgets to the Executive Director;
  • Evaluating communication outcomes on a regular basis to provide input into impact assessment and future planning;
  • Other duties as assigned by the Executive Director.

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities, and Requirements:

  • A degree in communications, journalism, public relations, or marketing; or a combination of formal schooling, self-education, prior experience and on-the-job training;
  • Three or more years of demonstrated communications experience – particularly experience in non-profit or community-based organizations is an asset;
  • Outstanding written and verbal communication skills with the ability write, proofread, and edit website and digital content, speeches, stories, reports, presentations, annual reports, etc.;
  • Excellent computer skills (Microsoft Office: Outlook, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Office 365);
  • Strong Media Relations skills – interviews, messaging, relationship building, and tracking;
  • Advertising and promotion – create or outsource creative, media buying, and measurement using print, video, television, radio, digital, billboard, location signs, and social media;
  • Advocacy – experience in non-profit or community-based organizations, social issues, community mobilization, campaigns, messaging, and measurement;
  • Strong organizational skills and a commitment to professionalism, including the ability to multi-task, managing timelines and multiple deadlines;
  • Excellent interpersonal and cross-cultural communication skills with demonstrated welcoming, respectful approach to interactions;
  • Independent, energetic, analytical, self-starting and responsible worker, driven by successful, punctual and quality outcomes;
  • Familiarity with the multicultural community, the issues it faces, anti-racism and the benefits of diversity is a significant asset;
  • Demonstrate a proven track record of working harmoniously within teams;
  • Have the ability to travel in Saskatchewan from time to time, and have a valid driver’s licence;
  • Be willing to work occasional evenings and weekends.

Application Process:

In order to have Communications Coordinator starting by the end of August (if possible), timelines are short. Please email your application (subject line: Communications Coordinator position) to Rhonda Rosenberg, Executive Director, at hr@mcos.ca by 12:00 p.m. on Friday, September 17, 2021.

We will only contact shortlisted applicants for interviews. The interview process will include an experiential assignment.

Include the following in your application:

  • Cover letter and resume clearly outlining how you meet the education, experience, knowledge, skills, abilities, and requirements for this position.
  • Portfolio with the following examples: campaign or project plan, news release, media advisory, speech, talking points, article, and creative that you have designed (poster, website graphic, etc.).
  • Three professional references (ensure they are ready and available to be contacted by email)

Only candidates currently living in and legally entitled to work in Canada will be considered.

Download Job Description

MCoS Communications Coordinator – Job Description 2021 (pdf)

Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, November 21-29, 2020

In 1974, Saskatchewan was the first province to enact multiculturalism legislation, recognizing the right of every community to retain its identity, language and traditional arts and sciences for the mutual benefit of citizens. In 1997, the Act was revised and a section of the Act states the policy should preserve, strengthen and promote Aboriginal cultures and acknowledge their historic and current contribution to development of Saskatchewan. More information is available on The Saskatchewan Multiculturalism Act. Responsibility for the Act resides with the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport.


MCoS Multicultural Honours Award Nominations

Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, MCoS Multicultural Honours, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Volunteer, Award, Lieutenant Governor, Government House, Multicultural, Racism, Intercultural, Diversity, Saskatchewan

Janelle Pewapsconias is the 2015 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award Recipient and Jebunnessa Chapola is the Betty Szuchewycz Award 2015 recipient.

Nominations due Thursday , October 1, 2020

MCoS Multicultural Honours is a Celebration in Honour of Multicultural Contributions
Hosted by the Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan through the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan

The Awards

Saskatchewan Multicultural Leadership Award for outstanding contributions to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. Priority will be given to nominees who have demonstrated sustained periods of commitment in their contributions. (The Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU) is partnering with MCoS to present this award, which includes a $500 donation to the recipient’s charity of choice.)

Multicultural Youth Leadership Award for promising contributions from people 29 years and under. (The Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU) is partnering with MCoS to present this award, which now includes a $500 reward.)

Nominate

For all the details, nomination forms, samples, and stories about past recipients, visit: MCoS Multicultural Honours 


Call for Nominations for Multicultural Superheroes

Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero?

As we prepare to celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week November 21-29, 2020 we are asking you to nominate “Multicultural Superheroes” to honour the significant impact they have made in our province through the five streams of multicultural work. MCoS Multicultural Honours: A Celebration in Honour of Multicultural Contributions is an annual event hosted by the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan during Saskatchewan Multicultural Week. The awards presented are the  Saskatchewan Multicultural Leadership Award and the Multicultural Youth Leadership Award.


Related Links

Building Welcoming Communities
MCoS Multicultural Honours
Saskatchewan Muticultural Week

Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Betty Szuchewycz Award, Contribution, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Government House, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Multicultural Youth Leadership Award, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Nominate, Nomination, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer

Multicultural Awards Honour Multicultural Superheroes

Awards Program Highlights benefits of Diversity

Members of Saskatchewan’s multicultural community gathered at Government House in Regina on November 17, 2018 for MCoS Multicultural Honours to recognize significant contributions to multiculturalism by our very own multicultural superheroes. This annual hallmark event kicks-off Saskatchewan Multicultural Week and our host was His Honour the Honourable W. Thomas Molloy, Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan. 
Master of Ceremonies and Executive Director of the Lieutenant Governor’s Office, Heather Salloum, began the event by acknowledging that Government House is in Treaty 4 territory. We pay our respects to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another through mutual respect and partnerships that began over 150 years ago. We are all Treaty People. This land is the traditional meeting ground and homeland of the First Nations, including Nehiyaw/Cree, Saulteaux, Dene, Nakota, Lakota, Dakota, and the Métis. 
We were honoured to have Elder Archie Weenie provide the opening blessing, setting the tone for a respectful and meaningful gathering. The Honourable Tom Molloy was sworn-in as Saskatchewan’s 22nd Lieutenant Governor provided opening remarks, underscoring the realities of the Saskatchewan motto From Many Peoples Strength, and his commitment to reduce racism. The Honourable Gene Makowsky, Minister for Parks, Culture and Sport offered remarks, reiterating the benefits of diversity. Finally, Neeraj Saroj, President of the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, brought remarks celebrating volunteers and multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. He also introduced the presentation. 
This year’s presentation highlighted the Sheldon-Williams Collegiate Mindful Creative Writing Course featuring a reading by Mays Al Jamous, student, of her poem titled “Being a Refugee.” The video about the school program and the poetry reading provide excellent examples of multicultural superheroes who inspire us to build welcoming and inclusive communities in our province.

Awards Nominees and Recipients

Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Betty Szuchewycz Award, Contribution, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Government House, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Multicultural Youth Leadership Award, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Nominate, Nomination, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer
The MCoS recognition committee, comprised of board and community members, assesses all nominees on their contributions to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through all five streams of multicultural work – Cultural Continuity, Celebration of Diversity, Anti-Racism, Intercultural Connections, and Integration – and decides the recipients.  
The Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU) once again partnered with the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan to sponsor the Multicultural Youth Leadership Award. SGEU President, Bob Bymoen, brought remarks and introduced the award.  
This year’s Multicultural Youth Leadership Award nominees are Nour Albaradan who stands out for her strong and effective involvement in school in the short time she has been in Canada, and Jiazhi Ding who is an International student at the University of Saskatchewan. He has stood up for the rights of Falun Gong and Black Lives Matter, as well as supported newcomers.  
The recipient of the 2018 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award is Nour Albaradan. She received an award of $500 from MCoS and SGEU. 
Nour has used her experience, voice, and passion to contribute meaningfully to the recognition and celebration of multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. Nour is proud of her Syrian heritage, so she is happy to share her culture, language, delicious food, and refugee experiences with others. Nour is always willing to let her voice be heard for equity and against discrimination, which requires extra practice in her new language. Her willingness to share her story and experiences in order to foster deeper learning and true understanding makes her an intercultural role model. Nour was part of Sheldon’s first Mindful Creative Writing class, where her openness and dedication to understanding, created an environment of inclusion that allowed other students to learn from her story and become confident in sharing their own stories. Nour’s contributions to her new Canadian home have been truly astounding! She uses her powerful voice to create awareness and connection. She is a multicultural superhero who does not allow anything to stop her. (Read: Nour Albaradan Full Bio)
Muna De Ciman, MCoS Director and Chair of the Recognition Committee, introduced the Betty Szuchewycz Award. In partnership with the Saskatchewan Government Employees’ Union, Muna presented the nominees and recipient of the 2018 Betty Szuchewycz Award.   
The committee received four Betty Szuchewycz Award nominees. Barb Dedi stands out for her extensive local work with individuals and groups to bridge gaps between communities. Hasanthi Galhenage is the director of the Cathedral Area Co-operative Daycare. She uses her leadership role to cultivate a learning environment that celebrates commonalities and differences. Paul Kardynal has been a champion for new immigrants to Canada and Ukrainian Canadians in the Battlefords and northwest Saskatchewan for over 30 years. Yaseen Khan is very committed to taking initiatives to create awareness of cultural diversity in the workplace. He has shown leadership in accommodating multifaith practices at SaskTel.  
The 2018 Betty Szuchewycz Award recipient is Barb Dedi. She selected Spring Free From Racism for a donation of $500 from MCoS and SGEU.
Barb demonstrates her life-long commitment to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through extensive local work with individuals, groups and organizations in Regina, as well as involvement with provincial, national and international organizations focusing on human rights, employment equity, labour, racism, and psychiatry issues. Barb is a cultural continuity role model as she promotes ethnocultural organizations to strengthen the diversity in Regina and Canada. Barb’s dedication to recognizing and rejecting racism are readily evident. She is the President of Spring Free From Racism Saskatchewan Association on Human Rights Inc. and has been active in this provincial organization for close to 40 years of its 50-year history. Barb’s life is a story of intercultural connections; she welcomes and creates opportunities for people to share their story, their journey and their intercultural experiences. She supports organizations to develop a deeper understanding of what cultural diversity means and to create a respectful and fair community where everyone is welcome. As a force for integration, ensuring all people are seen as contributors, Barb has been an activist in the labour movement and political realm for human rights, equity and women’s committees. Barb’s impressive work has been noted with awards and nominations, including the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal, SGEU and YWCA. Through her forty years of leadership, she has fostered new leaders who take significant roles in their own ethnocultural communities, lead workshops, coordinate pavilions to celebrate their culture and our diversity, and address racism and discrimination. (Read: Barb Dedi Full Bio) 

Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week 

Act, Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Superhero, Multicultural Superhero, multiculturalism, Newcomer, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer
We celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week to recognize that in 1974, Saskatchewan was the first province to enact multiculturalism legislation. Responsibility for the Act resides with the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport.  Learn more & view the Act: http://mcos.ca/saskatchewan-multicultural-week/  
We also celebrate through the campaign: Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero? Tell us and Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week all November. Use #MulticulturalSuperhero on social media. This campaign outlines successful examples of leaders being able to inspire others through their values, beliefs and actions. Learn more about the campaign: http://mcos.ca/multiculturalsuperhero

MCoS Multicultural Honours Awards Photo Gallery

Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero?

As we prepare to celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week November 16-24, we are asking you to nominate “Multicultural Superheroes” to honour the significant impact they have made in our province through the five streams of multicultural work. MCoS Multicultural Honours: A Celebration in Honour of Multicultural Contributions is an annual event hosted by the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan during Saskatchewan Multicultural Week. The awards presented are the Betty Szuchewycz Award and the Multicultural Youth Leadership Award.


Promo Videos

Watch people share who their Multicultural Superheroes are and why.

For all the details, nomination forms and stories about past recipients, visit: MCoS Multicultural Honours 


Related Links

Building Welcoming Communities
MCoS Multicultural Honours
Saskatchewan Muticultural Week

Act, Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Superhero, Multicultural Superhero, multiculturalism, Newcomer, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer

Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week | Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero?

About Saskatchewan Multicultural Week

Saskatchewan Multicultural Week takes place November 16-24, 2019. It has two main purposes: 1) It recognizes the Saskatchewan Multiculturalism Act and 2) Celebrates the cultural diversity and contributions to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. This is a key way we can create welcoming and inclusive communities.

  • In 1974, Saskatchewan was the first province to enact multiculturalism legislation – we can be proud of this progressive thinking and leadership we have demonstrated.
  • Responsibility for the Act resides with the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport who proclaims Saskatchewan Multicultural Week as do many other communities across the province
  • Each year, we create a resource called ‘Building Welcoming Communities’ that provides helpful tips for creating welcoming and inclusive communities. It is available for download.

About the Campaign

To celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, we are running a campaign all November. This year, our theme is Who’s your Multicultural Superhero?’ with the hashtag #MulticulturalSuperhero.

  • Multicultural Superheroes serve as successful examples of leaders who inspire others through their values, beliefs and actions (Learn more)
  • Examples of Multicultural Superheroes: Leaders of all types: Organizations, Movements, Individuals (Family Members; Friends; Politicians; Activists; Famous People; Comic book, TV, Movie and Book Characters; Authors; Artists; Athletes; etc.)
  • Participate: Tell us who your multicultural superhero is and why using #MulticulturalSuperhero social media. You can share any way that you want – video, writing, poem, tweet, music, dance, photo and caption and so on.

About MCoS Multicultural Honours

Every year, through the MCoS Multicultural Honours Awards, the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan recognizes Saskatchewan’s very own multicultural Superheroes who have made significant and promising contributions to multiculturalism in our province.
We accept nominations for the Betty Szuchewycz Award and the Multicultural youth Leadership Award, both presented in partnership with SGEU. This year’s recipients will be announced on November 16 at the Honours Awards.


Related Links

Building Welcoming Communities
MCoS Multicultural Honours
Saskatchewan Multicultural Week
Who is Your Multicultural Superhero?

Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Betty Szuchewycz Award, Contribution, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Government House, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Multicultural Youth Leadership Award, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Nominate, Nomination, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer

Multicultural Awards Honour Multicultural Superheroes

Awards Program Highlights benefits of Diversity

Members of Saskatchewan’s multicultural community gathered at Government House in Regina on November 17, 2018 for MCoS Multicultural Honours to recognize significant contributions to multiculturalism by our very own multicultural superheroes. This annual hallmark event kicks-off Saskatchewan Multicultural Week and our host was His Honour the Honourable W. Thomas Molloy, Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan. 
Master of Ceremonies and Executive Director of the Lieutenant Governor’s Office, Heather Salloum, began the event by acknowledging that Government House is in Treaty 4 territory. We pay our respects to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another through mutual respect and partnerships that began over 150 years ago. We are all Treaty People. This land is the traditional meeting ground and homeland of the First Nations, including Nehiyaw/Cree, Saulteaux, Dene, Nakota, Lakota, Dakota, and the Métis. 
We were honoured to have Elder Archie Weenie provide the opening blessing, setting the tone for a respectful and meaningful gathering. The Honourable Tom Molloy was sworn-in as Saskatchewan’s 22nd Lieutenant Governor provided opening remarks, underscoring the realities of the Saskatchewan motto From Many Peoples Strength, and his commitment to reduce racism. The Honourable Gene Makowsky, Minister for Parks, Culture and Sport offered remarks, reiterating the benefits of diversity. Finally, Neeraj Saroj, President of the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, brought remarks celebrating volunteers and multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. He also introduced the presentation. 
This year’s presentation highlighted the Sheldon-Williams Collegiate Mindful Creative Writing Course featuring a reading by Mays Al Jamous, student, of her poem titled “Being a Refugee.” The video about the school program and the poetry reading provide excellent examples of multicultural superheroes who inspire us to build welcoming and inclusive communities in our province.

Awards Nominees and Recipients

Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Betty Szuchewycz Award, Contribution, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Government House, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Multicultural Youth Leadership Award, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Nominate, Nomination, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer
The MCoS recognition committee, comprised of board and community members, assesses all nominees on their contributions to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through all five streams of multicultural work – Cultural Continuity, Celebration of Diversity, Anti-Racism, Intercultural Connections, and Integration – and decides the recipients.  
The Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU) once again partnered with the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan to sponsor the Multicultural Youth Leadership Award. SGEU President, Bob Bymoen, brought remarks and introduced the award.  
This year’s Multicultural Youth Leadership Award nominees are Nour Albaradan who stands out for her strong and effective involvement in school in the short time she has been in Canada, and Jiazhi Ding who is an International student at the University of Saskatchewan. He has stood up for the rights of Falun Gong and Black Lives Matter, as well as supported newcomers.  
The recipient of the 2018 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award is Nour Albaradan. She received an award of $500 from MCoS and SGEU. 
Nour has used her experience, voice, and passion to contribute meaningfully to the recognition and celebration of multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. Nour is proud of her Syrian heritage, so she is happy to share her culture, language, delicious food, and refugee experiences with others. Nour is always willing to let her voice be heard for equity and against discrimination, which requires extra practice in her new language. Her willingness to share her story and experiences in order to foster deeper learning and true understanding makes her an intercultural role model. Nour was part of Sheldon’s first Mindful Creative Writing class, where her openness and dedication to understanding, created an environment of inclusion that allowed other students to learn from her story and become confident in sharing their own stories. Nour’s contributions to her new Canadian home have been truly astounding! She uses her powerful voice to create awareness and connection. She is a multicultural superhero who does not allow anything to stop her. (Read: Nour Albaradan Full Bio)
Muna De Ciman, MCoS Director and Chair of the Recognition Committee, introduced the Betty Szuchewycz Award. In partnership with the Saskatchewan Government Employees’ Union, Muna presented the nominees and recipient of the 2018 Betty Szuchewycz Award.   
The committee received four Betty Szuchewycz Award nominees. Barb Dedi stands out for her extensive local work with individuals and groups to bridge gaps between communities. Hasanthi Galhenage is the director of the Cathedral Area Co-operative Daycare. She uses her leadership role to cultivate a learning environment that celebrates commonalities and differences. Paul Kardynal has been a champion for new immigrants to Canada and Ukrainian Canadians in the Battlefords and northwest Saskatchewan for over 30 years. Yaseen Khan is very committed to taking initiatives to create awareness of cultural diversity in the workplace. He has shown leadership in accommodating multifaith practices at SaskTel.  
The 2018 Betty Szuchewycz Award recipient is Barb Dedi. She selected Spring Free From Racism for a donation of $500 from MCoS and SGEU.
Barb demonstrates her life-long commitment to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through extensive local work with individuals, groups and organizations in Regina, as well as involvement with provincial, national and international organizations focusing on human rights, employment equity, labour, racism, and psychiatry issues. Barb is a cultural continuity role model as she promotes ethnocultural organizations to strengthen the diversity in Regina and Canada. Barb’s dedication to recognizing and rejecting racism are readily evident. She is the President of Spring Free From Racism Saskatchewan Association on Human Rights Inc. and has been active in this provincial organization for close to 40 years of its 50-year history. Barb’s life is a story of intercultural connections; she welcomes and creates opportunities for people to share their story, their journey and their intercultural experiences. She supports organizations to develop a deeper understanding of what cultural diversity means and to create a respectful and fair community where everyone is welcome. As a force for integration, ensuring all people are seen as contributors, Barb has been an activist in the labour movement and political realm for human rights, equity and women’s committees. Barb’s impressive work has been noted with awards and nominations, including the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal, SGEU and YWCA. Through her forty years of leadership, she has fostered new leaders who take significant roles in their own ethnocultural communities, lead workshops, coordinate pavilions to celebrate their culture and our diversity, and address racism and discrimination. (Read: Barb Dedi Full Bio) 

Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week 

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We celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week to recognize that in 1974, Saskatchewan was the first province to enact multiculturalism legislation. Responsibility for the Act resides with the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport.  Learn more & view the Act: http://mcos.ca/saskatchewan-multicultural-week/  
We also celebrate through the campaign: Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero? Tell us and Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week all November. Use #MulticulturalSuperhero on social media. This campaign outlines successful examples of leaders being able to inspire others through their values, beliefs and actions. Learn more about the campaign: http://mcos.ca/multiculturalsuperhero

MCoS Multicultural Honours Awards Photo Gallery

Join the conversation: Anti-racism engagement

Current status: Open (closes December 9, 2018)
Department of Canadian Heritage

This engagement on anti-racism is open to all Canadians and we want to hear from you! We invite you to lend your voice, views and experiences. Your input is essential to ensure our work to address racism reflects your experiences and your suggestions.

A new national anti-racism strategy
Racism divides communities, breeds fear and fuels animosity. Addressing racism and discrimination is a longstanding commitment of Canadians who see our country’s diversity as a source of strength. Canada is strong, not in spite of our differences, but because of them. Unfortunately, Canada is not immune to racism and discrimination — challenges remain when it comes to fully embracing diversity, openness and cooperation.
It is vital that Canada stands up to discrimination perpetrated against any individual or group of people on the basis of their religion and/or ethnicity and this is why the Government of Canada has committed to engage the public on a new federal anti-racism strategy. We are exploring racism as it relates to employment and income supports, social participation (for example, access to arts, sport and leisure) and justice. We are asking people across the country to inform this new strategy in meaningful, relevant, and solutions-focused discussions based on these topics.

Notice

These pages contain references to racism and discrimination, including online survey questions designed to collect personal experiences and beliefs on a voluntary basis. Materials may bring up past experiences of discomfort, anxiety, and/or trauma. Please engage with this content only when you feel prepared.
If you feel you have experienced discrimination or harassment based on one or more of the grounds protected under the Canadian Human Rights Act – including race, national or ethnic origin, colour and religion – you may be able to file a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

Join in: How to participate

In-person sessions are also being held with community members, leaders, experts (particularly those with lived experience), academics, and stakeholders across Canada. These meetings will not be open to the public in order to ensure that participants are able to have focused, meaningful and safe conversations on subjects that, for many, include reflecting on harmful experiences.
Thank you for your interest. We look forward to your contribution.

Who can participate

We’re interested in hearing from all Canadians, especially those who have direct experience with racism and discrimination and those who offer intersectional perspectives.

Key themes for discussion

To focus on those issues where racism and discrimination most directly touch people’s lives, as well as those policy areas that most closely overlap with the Government of Canada’s jurisdiction, the following themes will guide the engagement:

  • Employment and income supports
  • Social participation (for example, sport, art, leisure)
  • Justice

Related links

Contact us

Department of Canadian Heritage
Anti-Racism Engagement
15 Eddy Street
Gatineau QC K1A 0M5
Email
pch.antiracism-antiracisme.pch@canada.ca
Telephone
1-866-811-0055
1-866-811-0055 (toll-free)
TTY
1-888-997-3123 (toll-free)

Main link

https://www.canada.ca/en/canadian-heritage/campaigns/anti-racism-engagement.html 

A Rainbow of Culture in Rosthern

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Mayor Dennis Helmuth of Rosthern and Chief Roy Petit of Beardys Okemasis First Nation signing a Friendship Agreement in Rosthern, Fall 2017. This action taken by these two forward thinking and wonderful community leaders was nationally recognized by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.


With immigration at an all-time high in Saskatchewan, creating welcoming and inclusive communities for newcomers has never been more crucial. When people like where they live, feel needed and valued, and are able to sustain a comfortable way of life, they stay where they are and draw others into the community. It is a simple equation that the town of Rosthern has taken to the next level.

We moved here because two of my friends already lived here and they told us there were good job opportunities. So we felt very welcome here, especially our kids.

Several groups in Rosthern have sponsored refugee families, and word of mouth tends to travel far and wide when someone is settled and loving the community. Such was the case for Josephine and her family who moved from the Philippines in 2010. “We moved here because two of my friends already lived here and they told us there were good job opportunities. So we felt very welcome here, especially our kids. We really like Rosthern because it’s a very peaceful place; people are so nice, very friendly, helpful, caring, trusting and kind. I feel like we really belong here because we are treated equally.” Approximately 20 separate Filipino families call Rosthern home among dozens of other newcomers, and that surprises visitors to the town. But Josephine says it is also the many amenities in Rosthern like the hospital, banks, grocery store, and restaurants that keep people here. “We also like that the school is so close to our house. It makes life here very convenient.”
The two public schools in Rosthern are made up of approximately 25% English as an
Additional Language (EAL) students in their classrooms. It is a very high percentage that has the children teaching the adults a thing or two about embracing every colour of our cultural rainbow. Picking up bits and pieces of different languages has become the norm for the kids, giggling and encouraging each other to try out new words. Rosthern also has several adult EAL classes run by different volunteer groups that reach out into the community to expand the experiences of their students on a regular basis.
A diverse community displaying multiculturalism prospers in Rosthern: German, Métis, Filipino, Ukrainian, Syrian, Burmese, First Nations, Persian, East Indian, Karen, and the list just keeps growing! Mariam, a Syrian wife and mother says that the expanding multiculturalism is one of the reasons they liked Rosthern so much. “We do not feel that we are far from our families, we found a beautiful country and beautiful people here.” For Josephine, successful multiculturalism means “… living or being in a place where there is harmony, unity, respect and peace despite our differences in culture and beliefs.”

For Josephine, successful multiculturalism means “… living or being in a place where there is harmony, unity, respect and peace despite our differences in culture and beliefs.”

With that spirit of equal partnership, Rosthern and their friends to the North at Beardy’s Okemasis’ Cree Nation, recently signed a Friendship Agreement to solidify both communities’ commitment to working together. Chief of Beardy’s Okemasis’ Cree Nation, Roy Petit, and Mayor of Rosthern, Dennis Helmuth, are setting an example of creating welcoming and inclusive communities and embracing multiculturalism that shines like a bright beacon of hope. A beacon that welcomes all cultures, and because of this, will accomplish great things.

Photo Gallery

This blog was written and submitted by Kate Kading

International Women’s Day – Progress of Indigenous Women

Submitted by Guest Blogger, Jaspal Gill
International Women’s Day was started by the Suffragettes movement in the early 1900s, with the earliest celebration occurring in 1911. In particular there was outrage over a factory fire causing multiple deaths in New York in 1908. The cry for “Bread and Roses” is symbolic. The Roses represent women’s desire for better working conditions, and the bread represents the call for sustainable wages so as to be able to feed the families. Now, this day is celebrated every year in March worldwide to acknowledge the contribution of women. Each of us can play a purposeful role in the progress of women. With respect especially to the needs of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women, one way that we can work to advance this progress is by engaging immigrants into this dialogue.

With respect especially to the needs of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women, one way that we can work to advance this progress is by engaging immigrants into this dialogue.

As a South Asian immigrant woman, I have learned to appreciate the distinct strengths and values of Indigenous women in Canada, as well as the distinct needs and problems they face. The most challenging factor for immigrant women is finding the time to learn about other cultures.  Encouragement will help newcomers find the time. When I first moved to Canada, in 2002, options were limited for me and engaging with others was tough. I had little time to learn about the Canadian culture in general, let alone Indigenous cultures. But as I became more involved with the community for the last 14 years in Ontario, I realized I was not educated enough about their cultures in Canada. When looking to settle down in a new land, it is often easy to forget to learn about the Indigenous peoples in our new land.
In my case, the challenges of raising a family, finding a job, and learning to understand the system, deterred me from learning about Indigenous peoples, societies, and cultures. But I now realize that it is extremely important to encourage newcomers to understand and appreciate the role of Indigenous cultures in shaping Canada’s heritage, and connecting Canadian society to the land. Of course, this is not just important for newcomer Canadians, but for all Canadians as well.

But I now realize that it is extremely important to encourage newcomers to understand and appreciate the role of Indigenous cultures in shaping Canada’s heritage, and connecting Canadian society to the land.

Racism remains prevalent in Canada, even for a fastpaced developing society, despite past efforts from the people who broke barriers for change, activists such as Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. Unfortunately, women often end up being the target of racist attacks. South Asian immigrants need to do more to learn about the oppression of Indigenous peoples, to understand Indigenous cultures and values, and to stand with Indigenous women in the fight against racism, violence, and discrimination.
In my experience, many of my South Asian peers were not familiar with the cultural values or norms associated with Indigenous societies. Thankfully, the children of South Asian families are educated about the history and culture of Indigenous peoples growing up in Canadian schools.  However, those of us who immigrated as adults have to go out of our way to educate ourselves. It is imperative for dialogue to open up, and for public education for newcomer adults to include learning about Indigenous societies, history, cultures, and present conditions.
After moving to Treaty 6 Territory two years ago, I was shocked to witness the challenges Indigenous people face, especially the women. Educating ourselves will help us newcomers to assist in the eradication of oppression of Indigenous peoples, especially within the judicial system, rooted in racism within Canadian society. As South Asians have our own history of strong advocates for change, like Gandhi, we are natural allies in the battle against oppression of Indigenous Canadians.

After moving to Treaty 6 Territory two years ago, I was shocked to witness the challenges Indigenous people face, especially the women.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada called for providing better information for newcomers about the history of the diverse Indigenous peoples of Canada (Call to Action #93). More education is needed to give new Canadians a better understanding of Indigenous cultures and to engage them in Indigenous issues. This education is imperative so that new Canadians better serve Indigenous peoples and become involved in supporting the progress of Indigenous women. The immigrant’s participation during this process will make a significant difference in the community, and is absolutely necessary for reconciliation.
Oppressed Indigenous women can make progress this International Women’s Day, through raising awareness of their problems among the public, and by setting goals to work towards. The thematic discussion of this special day in March provides vast scope to discuss many issues affecting women. The physical limitations of poverty, violent acts against women, damage to self-esteem through the effects of negative media portrayals and stereotypical remarks, are all problems requiring attention in our shared struggle for equal rights. Awareness can be increased through social media: sharing and posting, on various platforms, about issues affecting women. Raising awareness online is one way to help spread the word and give these issues the attention they deserve.
Working as a legal professional in Prince Albert, I witness everyday the circumstances Indigenous people go through within the community. There are many ways that we all can become a part of the solution. Through the use of grassroots organizations, we have an opportunity to address the problem of oppression in Canada. By reaching out in the local communities to raise awareness of the issues affecting Indigenous peoples and vulnerable members of society, we can journey towards realizing real solutions. Such a journey will be well worth the effort.
We can engage the immigrant population on a grassroots level to become active participants in this journey. For example, a sizeable portion of immigrants have a preconceived notion that jury duty may be a risk to their lives. We need to educate newcomers that in Canada, this is simply not true.
At this time, we need everyone to participate in their local community and put their best foot forward, so that our nation, Canada, will feel like a home, rather than a house. As a step in the right direction, our generation must confront the shame and tragedy of racism, in order to end the marginalization of Indigenous women. Newcomers from South Asia and other parts of the world, especially those of us who are visible minorities, can play a role in raising awareness this International Women’s Day.

As a step in the right direction, our generation must confront the shame and tragedy of racism, in order to end the marginalization of Indigenous women.

Let’s make International Women’s Day this March 8, 2018 a successful one by engaging immigrants to take action and transform the lives of Indigenous women!


Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, culture, Diversity, EAL, Filipino, First Nations and Metis, From Many Peoples Strength, immigrant, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Partnership, Refugee, refugee family, saskatchewan, volunteer, TRC, reconciliationJaspal Gill is a lawyer at Arnot Heffernan Slobodian Law Office in Prince Albert. She carries on a general practice in all areas of law, with a particular interest on Criminal Law and Family Law. Jaspal also often conducts hearings of landlords and tenants disputes in Saskatchewan as a Hearing officer with the Office of Residential Tenancies. She has a diverse background which includes volunteering and community involvement. She is on the Development Appeals Board of the City of Prince Albert, the Board of Directors of YWCA Prince Albert and Prince Albert Multicultural Council.