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Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, November 21-29, 2020

In 1974, Saskatchewan was the first province to enact multiculturalism legislation, recognizing the right of every community to retain its identity, language and traditional arts and sciences for the mutual benefit of citizens. In 1997, the Act was revised and a section of the Act states the policy should preserve, strengthen and promote Aboriginal cultures and acknowledge their historic and current contribution to development of Saskatchewan. More information is available on The Saskatchewan Multiculturalism Act. Responsibility for the Act resides with the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport.


MCoS Multicultural Honours Award Nominations

Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, MCoS Multicultural Honours, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Volunteer, Award, Lieutenant Governor, Government House, Multicultural, Racism, Intercultural, Diversity, Saskatchewan

Janelle Pewapsconias is the 2015 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award Recipient and Jebunnessa Chapola is the Betty Szuchewycz Award 2015 recipient.

Nominations due Thursday , October 1, 2020

MCoS Multicultural Honours is a Celebration in Honour of Multicultural Contributions
Hosted by the Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan through the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan

The Awards

Saskatchewan Multicultural Leadership Award for outstanding contributions to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. Priority will be given to nominees who have demonstrated sustained periods of commitment in their contributions. (The Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU) is partnering with MCoS to present this award, which includes a $500 donation to the recipient’s charity of choice.)

Multicultural Youth Leadership Award for promising contributions from people 29 years and under. (The Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU) is partnering with MCoS to present this award, which now includes a $500 reward.)

Nominate

For all the details, nomination forms, samples, and stories about past recipients, visit: MCoS Multicultural Honours 


Call for Nominations for Multicultural Superheroes

Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero?

As we prepare to celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week November 21-29, 2020 we are asking you to nominate “Multicultural Superheroes” to honour the significant impact they have made in our province through the five streams of multicultural work. MCoS Multicultural Honours: A Celebration in Honour of Multicultural Contributions is an annual event hosted by the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan during Saskatchewan Multicultural Week. The awards presented are the  Saskatchewan Multicultural Leadership Award and the Multicultural Youth Leadership Award.


Related Links

Building Welcoming Communities
MCoS Multicultural Honours
Saskatchewan Muticultural Week

Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Betty Szuchewycz Award, Contribution, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Government House, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Multicultural Youth Leadership Award, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Nominate, Nomination, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer

Multicultural Awards Honour Multicultural Superheroes

Awards Program Highlights benefits of Diversity

Members of Saskatchewan’s multicultural community gathered at Government House in Regina on November 17, 2018 for MCoS Multicultural Honours to recognize significant contributions to multiculturalism by our very own multicultural superheroes. This annual hallmark event kicks-off Saskatchewan Multicultural Week and our host was His Honour the Honourable W. Thomas Molloy, Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan. 
Master of Ceremonies and Executive Director of the Lieutenant Governor’s Office, Heather Salloum, began the event by acknowledging that Government House is in Treaty 4 territory. We pay our respects to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another through mutual respect and partnerships that began over 150 years ago. We are all Treaty People. This land is the traditional meeting ground and homeland of the First Nations, including Nehiyaw/Cree, Saulteaux, Dene, Nakota, Lakota, Dakota, and the Métis. 
We were honoured to have Elder Archie Weenie provide the opening blessing, setting the tone for a respectful and meaningful gathering. The Honourable Tom Molloy was sworn-in as Saskatchewan’s 22nd Lieutenant Governor provided opening remarks, underscoring the realities of the Saskatchewan motto From Many Peoples Strength, and his commitment to reduce racism. The Honourable Gene Makowsky, Minister for Parks, Culture and Sport offered remarks, reiterating the benefits of diversity. Finally, Neeraj Saroj, President of the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, brought remarks celebrating volunteers and multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. He also introduced the presentation. 
This year’s presentation highlighted the Sheldon-Williams Collegiate Mindful Creative Writing Course featuring a reading by Mays Al Jamous, student, of her poem titled “Being a Refugee.” The video about the school program and the poetry reading provide excellent examples of multicultural superheroes who inspire us to build welcoming and inclusive communities in our province.

Awards Nominees and Recipients

Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Betty Szuchewycz Award, Contribution, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Government House, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Multicultural Youth Leadership Award, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Nominate, Nomination, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer
The MCoS recognition committee, comprised of board and community members, assesses all nominees on their contributions to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through all five streams of multicultural work – Cultural Continuity, Celebration of Diversity, Anti-Racism, Intercultural Connections, and Integration – and decides the recipients.  
The Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU) once again partnered with the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan to sponsor the Multicultural Youth Leadership Award. SGEU President, Bob Bymoen, brought remarks and introduced the award.  
This year’s Multicultural Youth Leadership Award nominees are Nour Albaradan who stands out for her strong and effective involvement in school in the short time she has been in Canada, and Jiazhi Ding who is an International student at the University of Saskatchewan. He has stood up for the rights of Falun Gong and Black Lives Matter, as well as supported newcomers.  
The recipient of the 2018 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award is Nour Albaradan. She received an award of $500 from MCoS and SGEU. 
Nour has used her experience, voice, and passion to contribute meaningfully to the recognition and celebration of multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. Nour is proud of her Syrian heritage, so she is happy to share her culture, language, delicious food, and refugee experiences with others. Nour is always willing to let her voice be heard for equity and against discrimination, which requires extra practice in her new language. Her willingness to share her story and experiences in order to foster deeper learning and true understanding makes her an intercultural role model. Nour was part of Sheldon’s first Mindful Creative Writing class, where her openness and dedication to understanding, created an environment of inclusion that allowed other students to learn from her story and become confident in sharing their own stories. Nour’s contributions to her new Canadian home have been truly astounding! She uses her powerful voice to create awareness and connection. She is a multicultural superhero who does not allow anything to stop her. (Read: Nour Albaradan Full Bio)
Muna De Ciman, MCoS Director and Chair of the Recognition Committee, introduced the Betty Szuchewycz Award. In partnership with the Saskatchewan Government Employees’ Union, Muna presented the nominees and recipient of the 2018 Betty Szuchewycz Award.   
The committee received four Betty Szuchewycz Award nominees. Barb Dedi stands out for her extensive local work with individuals and groups to bridge gaps between communities. Hasanthi Galhenage is the director of the Cathedral Area Co-operative Daycare. She uses her leadership role to cultivate a learning environment that celebrates commonalities and differences. Paul Kardynal has been a champion for new immigrants to Canada and Ukrainian Canadians in the Battlefords and northwest Saskatchewan for over 30 years. Yaseen Khan is very committed to taking initiatives to create awareness of cultural diversity in the workplace. He has shown leadership in accommodating multifaith practices at SaskTel.  
The 2018 Betty Szuchewycz Award recipient is Barb Dedi. She selected Spring Free From Racism for a donation of $500 from MCoS and SGEU.
Barb demonstrates her life-long commitment to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through extensive local work with individuals, groups and organizations in Regina, as well as involvement with provincial, national and international organizations focusing on human rights, employment equity, labour, racism, and psychiatry issues. Barb is a cultural continuity role model as she promotes ethnocultural organizations to strengthen the diversity in Regina and Canada. Barb’s dedication to recognizing and rejecting racism are readily evident. She is the President of Spring Free From Racism Saskatchewan Association on Human Rights Inc. and has been active in this provincial organization for close to 40 years of its 50-year history. Barb’s life is a story of intercultural connections; she welcomes and creates opportunities for people to share their story, their journey and their intercultural experiences. She supports organizations to develop a deeper understanding of what cultural diversity means and to create a respectful and fair community where everyone is welcome. As a force for integration, ensuring all people are seen as contributors, Barb has been an activist in the labour movement and political realm for human rights, equity and women’s committees. Barb’s impressive work has been noted with awards and nominations, including the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal, SGEU and YWCA. Through her forty years of leadership, she has fostered new leaders who take significant roles in their own ethnocultural communities, lead workshops, coordinate pavilions to celebrate their culture and our diversity, and address racism and discrimination. (Read: Barb Dedi Full Bio) 

Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week 

Act, Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Superhero, Multicultural Superhero, multiculturalism, Newcomer, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer
We celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week to recognize that in 1974, Saskatchewan was the first province to enact multiculturalism legislation. Responsibility for the Act resides with the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport.  Learn more & view the Act: http://mcos.ca/saskatchewan-multicultural-week/  
We also celebrate through the campaign: Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero? Tell us and Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week all November. Use #MulticulturalSuperhero on social media. This campaign outlines successful examples of leaders being able to inspire others through their values, beliefs and actions. Learn more about the campaign: http://mcos.ca/multiculturalsuperhero

MCoS Multicultural Honours Awards Photo Gallery

Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero?

As we prepare to celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week November 16-24, we are asking you to nominate “Multicultural Superheroes” to honour the significant impact they have made in our province through the five streams of multicultural work. MCoS Multicultural Honours: A Celebration in Honour of Multicultural Contributions is an annual event hosted by the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan during Saskatchewan Multicultural Week. The awards presented are the Betty Szuchewycz Award and the Multicultural Youth Leadership Award.


Promo Videos

Watch people share who their Multicultural Superheroes are and why.

For all the details, nomination forms and stories about past recipients, visit: MCoS Multicultural Honours 


Related Links

Building Welcoming Communities
MCoS Multicultural Honours
Saskatchewan Muticultural Week

Act, Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Superhero, Multicultural Superhero, multiculturalism, Newcomer, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer

Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week | Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero?

About Saskatchewan Multicultural Week

Saskatchewan Multicultural Week takes place November 16-24, 2019. It has two main purposes: 1) It recognizes the Saskatchewan Multiculturalism Act and 2) Celebrates the cultural diversity and contributions to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. This is a key way we can create welcoming and inclusive communities.

  • In 1974, Saskatchewan was the first province to enact multiculturalism legislation – we can be proud of this progressive thinking and leadership we have demonstrated.
  • Responsibility for the Act resides with the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport who proclaims Saskatchewan Multicultural Week as do many other communities across the province
  • Each year, we create a resource called ‘Building Welcoming Communities’ that provides helpful tips for creating welcoming and inclusive communities. It is available for download.

About the Campaign

To celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, we are running a campaign all November. This year, our theme is Who’s your Multicultural Superhero?’ with the hashtag #MulticulturalSuperhero.

  • Multicultural Superheroes serve as successful examples of leaders who inspire others through their values, beliefs and actions (Learn more)
  • Examples of Multicultural Superheroes: Leaders of all types: Organizations, Movements, Individuals (Family Members; Friends; Politicians; Activists; Famous People; Comic book, TV, Movie and Book Characters; Authors; Artists; Athletes; etc.)
  • Participate: Tell us who your multicultural superhero is and why using #MulticulturalSuperhero social media. You can share any way that you want – video, writing, poem, tweet, music, dance, photo and caption and so on.

About MCoS Multicultural Honours

Every year, through the MCoS Multicultural Honours Awards, the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan recognizes Saskatchewan’s very own multicultural Superheroes who have made significant and promising contributions to multiculturalism in our province.
We accept nominations for the Betty Szuchewycz Award and the Multicultural youth Leadership Award, both presented in partnership with SGEU. This year’s recipients will be announced on November 16 at the Honours Awards.


Related Links

Building Welcoming Communities
MCoS Multicultural Honours
Saskatchewan Multicultural Week
Who is Your Multicultural Superhero?

Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Betty Szuchewycz Award, Contribution, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Government House, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Multicultural Youth Leadership Award, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Nominate, Nomination, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer

Multicultural Awards Honour Multicultural Superheroes

Awards Program Highlights benefits of Diversity

Members of Saskatchewan’s multicultural community gathered at Government House in Regina on November 17, 2018 for MCoS Multicultural Honours to recognize significant contributions to multiculturalism by our very own multicultural superheroes. This annual hallmark event kicks-off Saskatchewan Multicultural Week and our host was His Honour the Honourable W. Thomas Molloy, Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan. 
Master of Ceremonies and Executive Director of the Lieutenant Governor’s Office, Heather Salloum, began the event by acknowledging that Government House is in Treaty 4 territory. We pay our respects to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and reaffirm our relationship with one another through mutual respect and partnerships that began over 150 years ago. We are all Treaty People. This land is the traditional meeting ground and homeland of the First Nations, including Nehiyaw/Cree, Saulteaux, Dene, Nakota, Lakota, Dakota, and the Métis. 
We were honoured to have Elder Archie Weenie provide the opening blessing, setting the tone for a respectful and meaningful gathering. The Honourable Tom Molloy was sworn-in as Saskatchewan’s 22nd Lieutenant Governor provided opening remarks, underscoring the realities of the Saskatchewan motto From Many Peoples Strength, and his commitment to reduce racism. The Honourable Gene Makowsky, Minister for Parks, Culture and Sport offered remarks, reiterating the benefits of diversity. Finally, Neeraj Saroj, President of the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, brought remarks celebrating volunteers and multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. He also introduced the presentation. 
This year’s presentation highlighted the Sheldon-Williams Collegiate Mindful Creative Writing Course featuring a reading by Mays Al Jamous, student, of her poem titled “Being a Refugee.” The video about the school program and the poetry reading provide excellent examples of multicultural superheroes who inspire us to build welcoming and inclusive communities in our province.

Awards Nominees and Recipients

Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Betty Szuchewycz Award, Contribution, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Government House, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Multicultural Youth Leadership Award, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Nominate, Nomination, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer
The MCoS recognition committee, comprised of board and community members, assesses all nominees on their contributions to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through all five streams of multicultural work – Cultural Continuity, Celebration of Diversity, Anti-Racism, Intercultural Connections, and Integration – and decides the recipients.  
The Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU) once again partnered with the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan to sponsor the Multicultural Youth Leadership Award. SGEU President, Bob Bymoen, brought remarks and introduced the award.  
This year’s Multicultural Youth Leadership Award nominees are Nour Albaradan who stands out for her strong and effective involvement in school in the short time she has been in Canada, and Jiazhi Ding who is an International student at the University of Saskatchewan. He has stood up for the rights of Falun Gong and Black Lives Matter, as well as supported newcomers.  
The recipient of the 2018 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award is Nour Albaradan. She received an award of $500 from MCoS and SGEU. 
Nour has used her experience, voice, and passion to contribute meaningfully to the recognition and celebration of multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. Nour is proud of her Syrian heritage, so she is happy to share her culture, language, delicious food, and refugee experiences with others. Nour is always willing to let her voice be heard for equity and against discrimination, which requires extra practice in her new language. Her willingness to share her story and experiences in order to foster deeper learning and true understanding makes her an intercultural role model. Nour was part of Sheldon’s first Mindful Creative Writing class, where her openness and dedication to understanding, created an environment of inclusion that allowed other students to learn from her story and become confident in sharing their own stories. Nour’s contributions to her new Canadian home have been truly astounding! She uses her powerful voice to create awareness and connection. She is a multicultural superhero who does not allow anything to stop her. (Read: Nour Albaradan Full Bio)
Muna De Ciman, MCoS Director and Chair of the Recognition Committee, introduced the Betty Szuchewycz Award. In partnership with the Saskatchewan Government Employees’ Union, Muna presented the nominees and recipient of the 2018 Betty Szuchewycz Award.   
The committee received four Betty Szuchewycz Award nominees. Barb Dedi stands out for her extensive local work with individuals and groups to bridge gaps between communities. Hasanthi Galhenage is the director of the Cathedral Area Co-operative Daycare. She uses her leadership role to cultivate a learning environment that celebrates commonalities and differences. Paul Kardynal has been a champion for new immigrants to Canada and Ukrainian Canadians in the Battlefords and northwest Saskatchewan for over 30 years. Yaseen Khan is very committed to taking initiatives to create awareness of cultural diversity in the workplace. He has shown leadership in accommodating multifaith practices at SaskTel.  
The 2018 Betty Szuchewycz Award recipient is Barb Dedi. She selected Spring Free From Racism for a donation of $500 from MCoS and SGEU.
Barb demonstrates her life-long commitment to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through extensive local work with individuals, groups and organizations in Regina, as well as involvement with provincial, national and international organizations focusing on human rights, employment equity, labour, racism, and psychiatry issues. Barb is a cultural continuity role model as she promotes ethnocultural organizations to strengthen the diversity in Regina and Canada. Barb’s dedication to recognizing and rejecting racism are readily evident. She is the President of Spring Free From Racism Saskatchewan Association on Human Rights Inc. and has been active in this provincial organization for close to 40 years of its 50-year history. Barb’s life is a story of intercultural connections; she welcomes and creates opportunities for people to share their story, their journey and their intercultural experiences. She supports organizations to develop a deeper understanding of what cultural diversity means and to create a respectful and fair community where everyone is welcome. As a force for integration, ensuring all people are seen as contributors, Barb has been an activist in the labour movement and political realm for human rights, equity and women’s committees. Barb’s impressive work has been noted with awards and nominations, including the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal, SGEU and YWCA. Through her forty years of leadership, she has fostered new leaders who take significant roles in their own ethnocultural communities, lead workshops, coordinate pavilions to celebrate their culture and our diversity, and address racism and discrimination. (Read: Barb Dedi Full Bio) 

Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week 

Act, Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Award, Discrimination, Education, From Many Peoples Strength, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, Superhero, Multicultural Superhero, multiculturalism, Newcomer, oppression, Racism, Rights, saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, volunteer
We celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week to recognize that in 1974, Saskatchewan was the first province to enact multiculturalism legislation. Responsibility for the Act resides with the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport.  Learn more & view the Act: http://mcos.ca/saskatchewan-multicultural-week/  
We also celebrate through the campaign: Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero? Tell us and Celebrate Saskatchewan Multicultural Week all November. Use #MulticulturalSuperhero on social media. This campaign outlines successful examples of leaders being able to inspire others through their values, beliefs and actions. Learn more about the campaign: http://mcos.ca/multiculturalsuperhero

MCoS Multicultural Honours Awards Photo Gallery

Join the conversation: Anti-racism engagement

Current status: Open (closes December 9, 2018)
Department of Canadian Heritage

This engagement on anti-racism is open to all Canadians and we want to hear from you! We invite you to lend your voice, views and experiences. Your input is essential to ensure our work to address racism reflects your experiences and your suggestions.

A new national anti-racism strategy
Racism divides communities, breeds fear and fuels animosity. Addressing racism and discrimination is a longstanding commitment of Canadians who see our country’s diversity as a source of strength. Canada is strong, not in spite of our differences, but because of them. Unfortunately, Canada is not immune to racism and discrimination — challenges remain when it comes to fully embracing diversity, openness and cooperation.
It is vital that Canada stands up to discrimination perpetrated against any individual or group of people on the basis of their religion and/or ethnicity and this is why the Government of Canada has committed to engage the public on a new federal anti-racism strategy. We are exploring racism as it relates to employment and income supports, social participation (for example, access to arts, sport and leisure) and justice. We are asking people across the country to inform this new strategy in meaningful, relevant, and solutions-focused discussions based on these topics.

Notice

These pages contain references to racism and discrimination, including online survey questions designed to collect personal experiences and beliefs on a voluntary basis. Materials may bring up past experiences of discomfort, anxiety, and/or trauma. Please engage with this content only when you feel prepared.
If you feel you have experienced discrimination or harassment based on one or more of the grounds protected under the Canadian Human Rights Act – including race, national or ethnic origin, colour and religion – you may be able to file a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

Join in: How to participate

In-person sessions are also being held with community members, leaders, experts (particularly those with lived experience), academics, and stakeholders across Canada. These meetings will not be open to the public in order to ensure that participants are able to have focused, meaningful and safe conversations on subjects that, for many, include reflecting on harmful experiences.
Thank you for your interest. We look forward to your contribution.

Who can participate

We’re interested in hearing from all Canadians, especially those who have direct experience with racism and discrimination and those who offer intersectional perspectives.

Key themes for discussion

To focus on those issues where racism and discrimination most directly touch people’s lives, as well as those policy areas that most closely overlap with the Government of Canada’s jurisdiction, the following themes will guide the engagement:

  • Employment and income supports
  • Social participation (for example, sport, art, leisure)
  • Justice

Related links

Contact us

Department of Canadian Heritage
Anti-Racism Engagement
15 Eddy Street
Gatineau QC K1A 0M5
Email
pch.antiracism-antiracisme.pch@canada.ca
Telephone
1-866-811-0055
1-866-811-0055 (toll-free)
TTY
1-888-997-3123 (toll-free)

Main link

https://www.canada.ca/en/canadian-heritage/campaigns/anti-racism-engagement.html 

A Rainbow of Culture in Rosthern

Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, Beardy’s Okemasis’ Cree Nation, culture, Diversity, EAL, f, Filipino, First Nations and Metis, From Many Peoples Strength, immigrant, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Partnership, Refugee, refugee family, Rosthern, saskatchewan, volunteer

Mayor Dennis Helmuth of Rosthern and Chief Roy Petit of Beardys Okemasis First Nation signing a Friendship Agreement in Rosthern, Fall 2017. This action taken by these two forward thinking and wonderful community leaders was nationally recognized by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.


With immigration at an all-time high in Saskatchewan, creating welcoming and inclusive communities for newcomers has never been more crucial. When people like where they live, feel needed and valued, and are able to sustain a comfortable way of life, they stay where they are and draw others into the community. It is a simple equation that the town of Rosthern has taken to the next level.

We moved here because two of my friends already lived here and they told us there were good job opportunities. So we felt very welcome here, especially our kids.

Several groups in Rosthern have sponsored refugee families, and word of mouth tends to travel far and wide when someone is settled and loving the community. Such was the case for Josephine and her family who moved from the Philippines in 2010. “We moved here because two of my friends already lived here and they told us there were good job opportunities. So we felt very welcome here, especially our kids. We really like Rosthern because it’s a very peaceful place; people are so nice, very friendly, helpful, caring, trusting and kind. I feel like we really belong here because we are treated equally.” Approximately 20 separate Filipino families call Rosthern home among dozens of other newcomers, and that surprises visitors to the town. But Josephine says it is also the many amenities in Rosthern like the hospital, banks, grocery store, and restaurants that keep people here. “We also like that the school is so close to our house. It makes life here very convenient.”
The two public schools in Rosthern are made up of approximately 25% English as an
Additional Language (EAL) students in their classrooms. It is a very high percentage that has the children teaching the adults a thing or two about embracing every colour of our cultural rainbow. Picking up bits and pieces of different languages has become the norm for the kids, giggling and encouraging each other to try out new words. Rosthern also has several adult EAL classes run by different volunteer groups that reach out into the community to expand the experiences of their students on a regular basis.
A diverse community displaying multiculturalism prospers in Rosthern: German, Métis, Filipino, Ukrainian, Syrian, Burmese, First Nations, Persian, East Indian, Karen, and the list just keeps growing! Mariam, a Syrian wife and mother says that the expanding multiculturalism is one of the reasons they liked Rosthern so much. “We do not feel that we are far from our families, we found a beautiful country and beautiful people here.” For Josephine, successful multiculturalism means “… living or being in a place where there is harmony, unity, respect and peace despite our differences in culture and beliefs.”

For Josephine, successful multiculturalism means “… living or being in a place where there is harmony, unity, respect and peace despite our differences in culture and beliefs.”

With that spirit of equal partnership, Rosthern and their friends to the North at Beardy’s Okemasis’ Cree Nation, recently signed a Friendship Agreement to solidify both communities’ commitment to working together. Chief of Beardy’s Okemasis’ Cree Nation, Roy Petit, and Mayor of Rosthern, Dennis Helmuth, are setting an example of creating welcoming and inclusive communities and embracing multiculturalism that shines like a bright beacon of hope. A beacon that welcomes all cultures, and because of this, will accomplish great things.

Photo Gallery

This blog was written and submitted by Kate Kading

International Women’s Day – Progress of Indigenous Women

Submitted by Guest Blogger, Jaspal Gill
International Women’s Day was started by the Suffragettes movement in the early 1900s, with the earliest celebration occurring in 1911. In particular there was outrage over a factory fire causing multiple deaths in New York in 1908. The cry for “Bread and Roses” is symbolic. The Roses represent women’s desire for better working conditions, and the bread represents the call for sustainable wages so as to be able to feed the families. Now, this day is celebrated every year in March worldwide to acknowledge the contribution of women. Each of us can play a purposeful role in the progress of women. With respect especially to the needs of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women, one way that we can work to advance this progress is by engaging immigrants into this dialogue.

With respect especially to the needs of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women, one way that we can work to advance this progress is by engaging immigrants into this dialogue.

As a South Asian immigrant woman, I have learned to appreciate the distinct strengths and values of Indigenous women in Canada, as well as the distinct needs and problems they face. The most challenging factor for immigrant women is finding the time to learn about other cultures.  Encouragement will help newcomers find the time. When I first moved to Canada, in 2002, options were limited for me and engaging with others was tough. I had little time to learn about the Canadian culture in general, let alone Indigenous cultures. But as I became more involved with the community for the last 14 years in Ontario, I realized I was not educated enough about their cultures in Canada. When looking to settle down in a new land, it is often easy to forget to learn about the Indigenous peoples in our new land.
In my case, the challenges of raising a family, finding a job, and learning to understand the system, deterred me from learning about Indigenous peoples, societies, and cultures. But I now realize that it is extremely important to encourage newcomers to understand and appreciate the role of Indigenous cultures in shaping Canada’s heritage, and connecting Canadian society to the land. Of course, this is not just important for newcomer Canadians, but for all Canadians as well.

But I now realize that it is extremely important to encourage newcomers to understand and appreciate the role of Indigenous cultures in shaping Canada’s heritage, and connecting Canadian society to the land.

Racism remains prevalent in Canada, even for a fastpaced developing society, despite past efforts from the people who broke barriers for change, activists such as Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. Unfortunately, women often end up being the target of racist attacks. South Asian immigrants need to do more to learn about the oppression of Indigenous peoples, to understand Indigenous cultures and values, and to stand with Indigenous women in the fight against racism, violence, and discrimination.
In my experience, many of my South Asian peers were not familiar with the cultural values or norms associated with Indigenous societies. Thankfully, the children of South Asian families are educated about the history and culture of Indigenous peoples growing up in Canadian schools.  However, those of us who immigrated as adults have to go out of our way to educate ourselves. It is imperative for dialogue to open up, and for public education for newcomer adults to include learning about Indigenous societies, history, cultures, and present conditions.
After moving to Treaty 6 Territory two years ago, I was shocked to witness the challenges Indigenous people face, especially the women. Educating ourselves will help us newcomers to assist in the eradication of oppression of Indigenous peoples, especially within the judicial system, rooted in racism within Canadian society. As South Asians have our own history of strong advocates for change, like Gandhi, we are natural allies in the battle against oppression of Indigenous Canadians.

After moving to Treaty 6 Territory two years ago, I was shocked to witness the challenges Indigenous people face, especially the women.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada called for providing better information for newcomers about the history of the diverse Indigenous peoples of Canada (Call to Action #93). More education is needed to give new Canadians a better understanding of Indigenous cultures and to engage them in Indigenous issues. This education is imperative so that new Canadians better serve Indigenous peoples and become involved in supporting the progress of Indigenous women. The immigrant’s participation during this process will make a significant difference in the community, and is absolutely necessary for reconciliation.
Oppressed Indigenous women can make progress this International Women’s Day, through raising awareness of their problems among the public, and by setting goals to work towards. The thematic discussion of this special day in March provides vast scope to discuss many issues affecting women. The physical limitations of poverty, violent acts against women, damage to self-esteem through the effects of negative media portrayals and stereotypical remarks, are all problems requiring attention in our shared struggle for equal rights. Awareness can be increased through social media: sharing and posting, on various platforms, about issues affecting women. Raising awareness online is one way to help spread the word and give these issues the attention they deserve.
Working as a legal professional in Prince Albert, I witness everyday the circumstances Indigenous people go through within the community. There are many ways that we all can become a part of the solution. Through the use of grassroots organizations, we have an opportunity to address the problem of oppression in Canada. By reaching out in the local communities to raise awareness of the issues affecting Indigenous peoples and vulnerable members of society, we can journey towards realizing real solutions. Such a journey will be well worth the effort.
We can engage the immigrant population on a grassroots level to become active participants in this journey. For example, a sizeable portion of immigrants have a preconceived notion that jury duty may be a risk to their lives. We need to educate newcomers that in Canada, this is simply not true.
At this time, we need everyone to participate in their local community and put their best foot forward, so that our nation, Canada, will feel like a home, rather than a house. As a step in the right direction, our generation must confront the shame and tragedy of racism, in order to end the marginalization of Indigenous women. Newcomers from South Asia and other parts of the world, especially those of us who are visible minorities, can play a role in raising awareness this International Women’s Day.

As a step in the right direction, our generation must confront the shame and tragedy of racism, in order to end the marginalization of Indigenous women.

Let’s make International Women’s Day this March 8, 2018 a successful one by engaging immigrants to take action and transform the lives of Indigenous women!


Aboriginal, Anti-Racism, culture, Diversity, EAL, Filipino, First Nations and Metis, From Many Peoples Strength, immigrant, Immigration, Indigenous Peoples, MCoS, multicultural, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, multiculturalism, Newcomer, Partnership, Refugee, refugee family, saskatchewan, volunteer, TRC, reconciliationJaspal Gill is a lawyer at Arnot Heffernan Slobodian Law Office in Prince Albert. She carries on a general practice in all areas of law, with a particular interest on Criminal Law and Family Law. Jaspal also often conducts hearings of landlords and tenants disputes in Saskatchewan as a Hearing officer with the Office of Residential Tenancies. She has a diverse background which includes volunteering and community involvement. She is on the Development Appeals Board of the City of Prince Albert, the Board of Directors of YWCA Prince Albert and Prince Albert Multicultural Council.
 

MCoS Multicultural Honours features Multicultural Superheroes

Honouring Significant Contributions to Multiculturalism in Saskatchewan

Event Highlights

On Saturday, November 19, 2016 over 100 members of Saskatchewan’s multicultural community gathered at Government House to kick off Saskatchewan Multicultural Week and honour some of Saskatchewan’s multicultural superheroes – people who have made significant contributions to the multicultural community in Saskatchewan.
Her Honour the Honourable Vaughn solomon Schofield, Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan hosted the event and was joined by Mark Docherty, MLA for Regina Coronation Park and

MCoS Multicultural Honours, Awards, Recipients, Multicultural Superhero, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, cultural diversity, intercultural, education, anti-racism, racism, multiculturalism, ethnic diversity, culture, ethnicity, awareness, acceptance

Over 100 members of the multicultural community gathered to celebrate significant contributions made to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan.

Legislative Secretary to the Premier of Saskatchewan for Immigration and Culture, Neeraj Saroj, Vice-President, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan and Bob Bymoen, President, Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU). Other special guests included Joanne McDonald, President, SaskCulture President, Muna DeCiman, Past Betty Szuchewycz Award recipient, and Joyce Vandall, former MCoS Board Member, Secretary and undisputed multicultural superhero.
Everyone gathered in the festive surroundings of Government House today to recognize significant contributions of Saskatchewan multicultural superheroes. All speakers touched on the fact that all of Saskatchewan is treaty land. We are all treaty people and each one of us can act on the TRC recommendations. Mr. Docherty was recognized for being a devoted supporter of all five streams of multicultural work in this province. It is through the support of Her Honour, Mr. Docherty and the Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport that multicultural superheroes are nurtured in Saskatchewan.
This event officially launched Saskatchewan Multicultural Week 2016, while the related campaign, Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero?, has been running all November. During this week, the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan celebrates both the benefits of and contributions to multiculturalism in our province. We do this by focusing on the multicultural values of Respect for Diversity, Recognition and Rejection of Racism, Intercultural Connections, and Integration, which are the cornerstones that inform our work and also engaging in the five streams of multicultural work: Cultural Continuity, Celebration of Diversity, Anti-Racism, Intercultural Connections and Integration.
These multicultural values and streams of work are rooted in the provincial motto From Many Peoples Strength and the treaty relationships that define our province. MCoS is proud to have been instrumental in developing the motto in our early days. This motto expresses Saskatchewan’s multicultural heritage, the contributions of First Nations and Métis cultures, and the key role of immigration in the province.
Each year at this time, we celebrate the anniversary of the Saskatchewan Multicultural Act. We can be proud that Saskatchewan was the first province to enact such legislation demonstrating that our political and community leaders chose to preserve, protect and promote all cultures in both the 1974 Saskatchewan Multiculturalism Act and the provincial motto: From Many Peoples Strength.
Time was taken to acknowledge and praise all volunteers – especially those voluteers of MCoS and its members. The many volunteers around the province make multiculturalism central to the cultural, economic, social and political life of Saskatchewan. In 2015-16, among MCoS members over 14,430 volunteers contributed over 299,203 hours of time – making them multicultural superheroes! Volunteers and staff with different cultural backgrounds bring different ways of seeing the world which can contribute to more effective decision-making and problem-solving.

Nominees and Recipients

Multicultural Youth Leadership Award 2016

The Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan and the Saskatchewan Government and General Employees’ Union (SGEU) will present the third annual Multicultural Youth Leadership Award to an individual who is 29 years of age and under. The 2016 award nominees are:

The 2016 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award recipient is Jellyn Ayudan who also received a $500 reward from SGEU. While still in high school, Jellyn is already active in all five streams of

The 2016 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award recipient is Jellyn Ayudan who also received a $500 reward from SGEU. While still in high school, Jellyn is already active in all five streams of multicultural work. She is pictured here with her high school mentor and family.

The 2016 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award recipient is Jellyn Ayudan who also received a $500 reward from SGEU. While still in high school, Jellyn is already active in all five streams of multicultural work. She is pictured here with her high school mentor and family.

multicultural work. As an immigrant herself, arriving in Canada in October of 2009 from the Philippines, she dedicates her life to empowering other new immigrants and refugees to achieve their fullest potential. A strong contributor to the stream of cultural continuity, Jellyn has been the President of Dr. Martin LeBoldus High School’s Multicultural Club for four years. This has enabled her to showcase her Filipino culture at the school and in the community. Extremely active in fulfilling the stream of celebration of diversity, Jellyn has been organizing the school’s Multicultural Week for four years. She aims to include as many cultures as possible while celebrating their differences and similarities. Some initiatives Jellyn participates in to achieve the anti-racism stream of work include working with “CluedINclude”, attending a workshop to learn about discrimination and privilege and then taking what she had learned and organizing a week-long event dedicated to eliminating racial discrimination. Jellyn has become active as a Regina Open Door Society Peer Leader where she helps newcomers and immigrants to settle and integrate into Canadian life. Jellyn always seeks to improve herself and advance her positive influence in the community through the five streams of multicultural work. Overtime, Jellyn’s contributions to multiculturalism slowly transcended outwards to her community and will continue to grow as she gets older and wiser. Her Honour, MCoS Vice-President Neeraj Saroj and SGEU President Bob Bymoen presented this year’s award to Jellyn.
View full bio of Jellyn Ayudan (pdf)

Betty Szuchewycz Award 2016

Each year, the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan presents the Betty Szuchewycz Award to an adult who has made significant contributions to the multicultural community. The 2016 award nominees are:

The recipient of the 2016 Betty Szuchewycz Award is Faeeza Moolla who will also select a charity for a donation of $500 from MCoS. Faeeza has contributed to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan

The recipient of the 2016 Betty Szuchewycz Award is Faeeza Moolla who will also select a charity for a donation of $500 from MCoS. Faeeza has contributed to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through all five streams of multicultural work. She is pictured here with her family and friends.

The recipient of the 2016 Betty Szuchewycz Award is Faeeza Moolla who will also select a charity for a donation of $500 from MCoS. Faeeza has contributed to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan through all five streams of multicultural work. She is pictured here with her family and friends.

through all five streams of multicultural work.  Faeeza immigrated to Regina from South Africa 18 years ago to start her newcomer journey. She used her experience of growing up in a country rife with apartheid restrictions, to engage in multiculturalism and build bridges across cultures and faiths. To achieve the stream of Cultural Continuity, Faeeza arrived in Regina and immediately sought out people of common cultural and religious backgrounds to feel at home. She volunteered for activities within her community, ranging from potlucks to religious festivals to children’s and family activities, with the sole purpose of giving new people a home. To carry out the stream of Celebration of Diversity, Faeeza focused on building bridges with other community groups and organizations. She used her connections as a representative of the Islamic Association of Saskatchewan to continuously reach out. Faeeza naturally gravitated to work on the stream of Anti-racism. Growing up in South Africa, Faeeza challenged racial inequality, fighting against the tyrannical apartheid regime until the free elections in 1994. Here in Saskatchewan, she joined Muslims for Peace and Justice, serving as a member, secretary and, vice-president, and president over the course of ten years. Her mission was to facilitate open discussions about systematic racism. In order to facilitate intercultural connections, Faeeza implemented a joint Eid Program for community and Government organizations, which was very successful, receiving several accolades. Faeeza is a long standing member of the Islamic Association of Saskatchewan and serves as a volunteer bridging gaps and overcoming differences. She also serves as a member on the Islamic History Month Canada Board, allowing her to highlight the benefits of integration to strengthen the community as a whole. Due to her significant contributions to the five streams of multicultural work in Saskatchewan, Faeeza was invited to be one of 150 community builders in Regina to participate in a national conversation on the future of Canada. Her Honour, MCoS Vice-President Neeraj Saroj and Renata Cosic, Secretary, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan and Recognition Committee Chair, presented this year’s award to Faeeza.
View full bio of Faeeza Moolla (pdf)

Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero?

Both recipients are strong examples of a multicultural superhero as their contributions fulfill the five multicultural streams of work: Cultural Continuity, Celebration of Diversity, Anti-Racism, Intercultural Connections and Integration. The five streams underlie the 2016 theme of Saskatchewan Multicultural Week, taking place November 19-27 and this year’s campaign, Who’s Your Multicultural Superhero? running until November 30th. We invite everyone to think about people who inspire you through by using their super powers of respect and inclusion to fight the villains of racism and oppression, people who build bridges between cultures and celebrate diversity in all its forms, people who embrace and share traditions, and people who help others to integrate into society. These people you have thought of are your multicultural superheroes. Share about this on Instagram and Twitter using #multiculturalsuperhero in any way you want. Be creative; the sky is the limit!


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Related Links

Saskatchewan Multicultural Week
Building Welcoming Communities
MCoS Multicultural Honours
Who is Your Multicultural Superhero?
#MulticulturalSuperhero Social Feed

MCoS Multicultural Honours

A Celebration in Honour of Multicultural Contributions
On Saturday, November 22, 2014 the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan recognized all those who have made significant contributions to the multicultural community. The event took place in the elegant setting of Government House in Regina and concluded Saskatchewan Multicultural Week. The event consisted of a ceremony featuring the WeAreSK PSAs, speeches and awards, followed by a reception in the ballroom with a sampling of cultural treats. About 100 people attended the event.
Heather Salloum, Executive Director of the Office of the Lieutenant Governor, the Honourable Mark Docherty, Minister of Parks, Culture and Sport, and Bruno Kossmann, MCoS President, spoke at the event. All spoke about how multiculturalism enriches Saskatchewan and the province’s commitment is demonstrated by the 40th anniversary of the original Saskatchewan Multicultural Act. Ms. Salloum delivered an eloquent reading on the real impact of volunteers. Finally, it was recognized that all the award nominees and the trailblazer who created the 1974 Act and the 1997 revision are leaders in the community and should be commended for their efforts.
Media were on site to interview the award recipients and Minister Docherty.

Awards:

Multicultural Youth Leadership Award The Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan and the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission presented the second annual Multicultural Youth Leadership Award to an individual who is 29 years of age and under and has made significant contributions to multiculturalism.
2014 Multicultural Youth Leadership Award recipient: Priya Kumari Bilkhu
Priya Kumari Bilkhu has been involved in Indian cultural activities since she was a young and energetic girl. With dance as a passion, Priya demonstrates an admirable willingness to learn, participate and share her Indian cultural heritage. Her pride and dedication were evident in her role as Youth Ambassador for the Indian Pavilion at Mosaic for 2 years. This afforded her many opportunities to interact with peers of various backgrounds and share her culture. She found it particularly heartwarming to perform for the elderly during “Bringing a Little Mosaic to You”.
The volunteer spirit extended to life at high school where she participated in the dance team, was MVP in grade 12 and has returned after graduation as Assistant Coach for the past 2 years. The leadership, team work and confidence built here also played a role in Priya’s involvement in Campbell Collegiate Business Club Executive Team where she found opportunities to combine her passion for multiculturalism with helping those in need in pioneering the multicultural lunch for Adopt-a-Family. She was part of a Bhangra dance performance for Multicultural Day at the high school that gave her the chance to show her peers where she is from and the beauty, the art and the fun of it all.
Priya is now a Youth representative on the India-Canada Association board and continues to enjoy sharing her culture and learning about others.
Betty Szuchewycz Award
Each year, the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan presents the Betty Szuchewycz Award for outstanding contributions to multiculturalism in the province.
2014 Betty Szuchewycz Award recipient: Nadine Williams
From a very young age Nadine has been an ambassador of culture, proudly sharing her own culture and celebrating the cultures of others. Nadine not only embraces her own culture, but she readily promotes inclusivity and multiculturalism as a means of bringing people together. For over 20 years Nadine has been steadily giving of her time as a participant, supporter, committee member, and executive board member of these organizations. By doing so she has helped to bridge the differences that exist among different groups, creating enduring relationships.
As an elementary and high school student Nadine participated in Regina Multicultural Council’s speech competitions for several years. Her speeches were aimed at educating her audience about the importance of diversity, and inspiring others to embrace multiculturalism.
Nadine’s commitment to culture continued with her involvement with the Saskatchewan Jamaican Association. (SJA). She has been an active member with SJA since the age of 12. She held the position of youth representative for several years, and has subsequently held the position of public relations officer on the SJA executive for the past 12 years, representing the SJA at media interviews to share information about Black History Month and Jamaican independence. Nadine is instrumental in coordinating Jamaican independence celebrations. Nadine also works tirelessly to coordinate Black History month events including a community breakfast, youth workshops and Gospel Fest, which now includes the Community Hero Award. The impact of Nadine’s work is seen in the sense of community, and in the individual and collective pride that is created through these events.
With the Saskatchewan Caribbean Canadian Association, she regularly volunteers at the Mosaic, serving as senior ambassador for the Caribbean pavilion at Mosaic 2014. She also actively promotes and volunteers at CariSask, a Caribbean festival held each July in Wascana Park.
Nadine has served three years on the Executive Committee for Saskatchewan Visible Minorities Employees Association, an organization that serves to promote equality and equal opportunity for all visible minorities working within the Saskatchewan government and Crown corporations.
Nadine’s interest and commitment to multiculturalism is one that started at a very young age and one that shows no signs of slowing down. She continues to devote countless hours to advancing multiculturalism. Culturally competent, she encourages, and supports her own children as well as all children and youth to be proud of their culture, to participate in various cultural activities throughout the city, and to value and celebrate cultural differences.

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